Recent Publications

India and the United States are poised at the threshold of a closer, more productive relationship than at any point in the recent past. India’s economy has advanced and is now the world’s sixth largest. New areas of partnership between India and the US—and particularly India and the Bay Area-Silicon Valley— are emerging as India’s economy is rapidly digitizing. The Bay Area is a major economic partner for India, and opportunities are growing.

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The city of Napa is a thriving commercial center for Napa County. Its economy’s unique and diverse combination of employment in agriculture, production, and retail; world- renowned hospitality offerings; and proximity to the core of the Bay Area—a major global innovation center—make Napa a city unlike any other in the world. With a robust hospitality sector and healthy production industry, Napa can play to its existing strengths, while building a more diversified economy in the future by attracting businesses and utilizing available space in innovative ways.

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Both the Howard Terminal site and the former Coliseum site have substantial room for development, are located within the region’s core, and have good access to highways and public transportation. At full build-out capacity, the A’s estimate that 6.6 million square feet will have been added, with 5.4 million square feet surrounding the ballpark at Howard Terminal. The developments as proposed would be one of the largest projects ever completed in the East Bay, and certainly one of the largest developments currently planned in the entire Bay Area.

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This report shares the learnings from the Bay Area Young Men of Color Employment Partnership (BAYEP) and provides recommendations for improving how the region’s business and civic leaders can create an inclusive economy through offering better supports and opportunities for young men of color and others systematically disadvantaged by our economic system. Our findings are informed by a rich literature as well as companion analyses by Policy Link, Urban Strategies Council and LeadersUp. Crucially, the voices of the young men themselves helped guide our conclusions as we incorporate the findings

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This report provides a snapshot of the Canadian economy and outlines the broad alignment of shared interests and values between Canada and the US, California, and the Bay Area.

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Until very recently, homelessness was considered the problem of individual cities and counties. For a metropolitan region like the Bay Area, which is divided into nine counties and 101 cities, this approach fails to meet the needs of an intraregionally mobile homeless population. In this report, a regional lens provides a new perspective on the homelessness crisis and offers new ways to address the problem.

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This report examines the scientific roots of the Bay Area’s innovation system and the contribution of public investment to the research on which much of the region’s technological success has been built. It provides data and analysis on how the ecosystem has evolved, discusses the roles of industry, federal, and state funding, and examines how research generated with public support has broad impacts on the economy.

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As the Affordable Care Act’s future continues to hang in the balance, the idea of implementing some form of universal healthcare system in California or nationwide has become increasingly popular. Much of this discussion has focused on the desirability and feasibility of adopting a Canadian-style single-payer or “Medicare for All” system. While Canada is a worthwhile case study to examine, there are other models for a universal healthcare system that may make more sense for California and the U.S., achieve better outcomes, and have a more feasible path to implementation. One such example is a “Universal European Health System,” inspired by the Bismarck model, most clearly exemplified by Germany. This report lays out what such a model could look like if implemented in California.

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The Oakland A’s have proposed the construction of a gondola system that will carry passengers from Washington St. and 10th St. in Old Oakland to Washington St. and Water St. in Jack London Square. This type of aerial transit system will bring frequency, reliability, and speed that other traditional types of transit lack. It will also create a link between BART and the new stadium and the amenities surrounding it.

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This report examines the ongoing, mostly state-based efforts aimed at lowering health care prices. It asks whether there are lessons California can learn from these experiments as well as limitations to importing similar practices into the state and expecting the same results. It also explores whether reinvigorating managed competition—a “made in California” alternative that tries to reduce total health care costs while improving quality of care—has the potential both to moderate prices and avoid the drawbacks of price controls.

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Investment in infrastructure has one of the highest economic multipliers of any form of government spending, but due to California’s failure to invest in and maintain its infrastructure at all levels, the state is putting its future growth and prosperity at risk. There is a demonstrated need to fundamentally reform public infrastructure procurement in California and the U.S., accelerate project delivery, and drive more widespread adoption of life-cycle management approaches. The role that public-private partnerships can play in addressing California’s infrastructure needs is the primary focus of this report.

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Tri-Valley Rising was published in 2014 with the aim of taking inventory of the Tri-Valley region’s assets and resources, explaining its impressive economic success, identifying challenges that could threaten to impede its future growth, and providing policy recommendations to ensure its continued vitality. Among the report’s findings were that the Tri-Valley’s innovation assets were driving its economy, high-value connections between the Tri-Valley and the broader region were growing, a high quality of life was a large part of the Tri-Valley’s competitive advantage, and improving transportation systems between the Tri-Valley and broader region would support growing economic activity and improve competitiveness.

This July 2018 update to Tri-Valley Rising builds on the findings and information presented in the first report, while also exploring more policy options for local and regional stakeholders to better connect and strengthen the Tri-Valley’s economy as it continues to grow.

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