Infrastructure and Investment

As California moves deeper into the 21st century, new technologies have changed the way that people interact with infrastructure—especially in the fields of communications and energy. The infrastructure of the future requires the development of connectivity across a resilient, flexible, and diverse electricity grid, which will need to support a clean energy future while also powering a growing number of advanced communication demands. To capture the full economic benefits of 21st century infrastructure investments, the state will need forward-looking planning and a regulatory structure that can adapt to rapidly changing technologies and consumer demands.

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Energy Storage

This report focuses on the emerging need for grid-scale storage, which must be prioritized but faces significant regulatory and market barriers. It presents an overview of projected energy storage needs, available technologies, market challenges, and regulatory policy developments, and it offers recommendations for how to accelerate investment in and deployment of new storage capacity. Accelerated progress toward meeting that goal will be essential to achieving a more flexible, balanced, low-carbon 21st century grid in California.
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The Economic Impacts of Infrastructure Investment

This analysis explores Santa Clara County’s current transportation characteristics, highlights planned projects, and quantifies the economic impacts of the county's November 2016 transportation ballot measure.
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Investing with Purpose

Over the last decade, the idea of impact investing—marrying financial returns with social returns—has moved from a nascent investment theory employed by a few philanthropic organizations and forward-thinking fund managers to a widely known buzzword in the investment industry. Investing with Purpose: Unlocking the Economic Potential of Impact Investments dissects the concept of impact investing and its potential social effects, and concludes with a set of recommendations for structural adjustments in the impact investing field.
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The Case for a Second Transbay Transit Crossing

Over the last decade, the idea of impact investing—marrying financial returns with social returns—has moved from a nascent investment theory employed by a few philanthropic organizations and forward-thinking fund managers to a widely known buzzword in the investment industry. Investing with Purpose: Unlocking the Economic Potential of Impact Investments intents to dissect the concept of impact investing and its potential social effects, and concludes with a set of recommendations for structural adjustments in the impact investing field.
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The Benefits of 21st Century Infrastructure

Given California’s unique industry mix of communications, information technology, clean energy, advanced materials, and other technical sectors, the state is well positioned to harness infrastructure innovations for significant state and regional benefit. This new infrastructure …

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21st Century Infrastructure

Today's technologies are advancing with blinding speed and their implications are being felt immediately, with rapid adoption by both businesses and consumers. California's ability to embrace this new paradigm will impact the competitiveness of its businesses and the quality of life of its citizens. California needs to embrace a dynamic vision of the future by adapting regulatory processes to enable the development of advanced infrastructure for both communications and energy. The results can be transformative, but only if California invests now in the technology and infrastructure that will lead it into the 21st century.
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Surviving the Storm

Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of such extreme weather events: 2014 was the record hottest year in state history, and according to tree-ring data, one of the driest in 500 years. At the same time, three of the wettest years in recorded California history have occurred since 1980. Along with sea level rise, extreme weather events are creating new risks to the world’s great coastal and delta regions, including the San Francisco- Silicon Valley-Oakland Bay Area. Against this backdrop, and with Hurricanes Sandy and Katrinastill in recent memory, what danger do extreme storms pose to the Bay Area economy today?